Saturday, May 8, 2021

Extra Ordinary: Magic, Mystery and Imagination in American Realism

The Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia 

Through Sunday, Jun 13, 2021


Feature Image

Saturday, Feb 27, 2021 — 



“Extra Ordinary” surveys a range of American artists who embraced realism, representation and classical artistic techniques in the face of the rising tide of abstraction at mid-century. Through sharp focus, suggestive ambiguity and an uncanny assemblage of ordinary things, their works not only show that the extraordinary is possible, but also conjure the strangeness and wonder of everyday life. 


Long overshadowed by the rise of abstract expressionism in the 1950s, magic realism’s reputation is on the way up again. The Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia will present the exhibition “Extra Ordinary: Magic, Mystery and Imagination in American Realism” from February 27 to June 13, 2021, seeking to reexamine how we define magic realism and expand the canon of artists who worked within this category.

The term “magic realism” was popularized in 1943 during the exhibition “American Realists and Magic Realists” at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), organized by curator Dorothy C. Miller with assistance from museum director Alfred H. Barr Jr. and arts impresario Lincoln Kirstein. The Georgia Museum of Art’s exhibition will include works originally presented in MoMA’s show, including paintings by Ivan Albright, Paul Cadmus, Z. Vanessa Helder and Patsy Santo, as well as other objects by many of the artists it featured.

Magic realism is often compared to surrealism, but while surrealism focuses on the life of the mind, magic realism is grounded in the real world, showing fantastical elements as a part of everyday life. The mood of magic realist works of art is often eerie and uncanny. Mystical components add to their mystery and invite viewers to look more closely. Magic realists were inspired by the German movement known as New Objectivity, and they also adapted aspects of European surrealism into an American visual language.

Jeffrey Richmond-Moll, curator of American art at the museum, organized the exhibition. He said, “Magic realism was very much rooted in ordinary life and was commenting very directly on the everyday experience of people in the United States — from wartime life and its aftermath to key social issues like race and civil rights or workers’ rights, to pressing environmental issues of the time.”

“Extra Ordinary” takes on the challenge of defining magic realism and organizing a diverse group of artists into one style – a style that may be unfamiliar to American audiences and has often been overlooked. The exhibition also emphasizes, in critic Clement Greenberg’s words, “the extreme eclecticism now prevailing” in the American art world during the mid-1900s. In so doing, it highlights a wider constellation of artists — including such women as Gertrude Abercrombie and Honoré Sharrer, such artists of color as Eldzier Cortor and Hughie Lee-Smith, and other artists from farther-flung regions such as Everett Spruce and Patrick Sullivan — who also turned to the mysterious, supernatural and hyperreal to examine key social issues of the day. These artists embraced magic or fantasy not as a means to escape everyday reality but as a way to engage more directly with it.

The exhibition is drawn primarily from two private collections with exceptional holdings in the magical realist genre, as well as major paintings in our own collection by Paul Cadmus, O. Louis Guglielmi, John Brock Lear, and others. It takes as its point of departure the 1943 show “American Realists and Magic Realists” at the Museum of Modern Art — when the term “magic realism” entered the American art historical lexicon — and will feature a suite of paintings originally included in MoMA’s show. By bringing together significant works by Ivan Albright, Cadmus, Philip Evergood, Jared French, Henry Koerner, George Tooker and John Wilde, along with a number of lesser known artists, “Extra Ordinary” reveals the slippery task of categorizing this eccentric group of painters into a single style. After all, the canon of artists we now identify as “magic realists” was codified through a series of exhibitions organized by curators Alfred H. Barr, Dorothy C. Miller and Lincoln Kirstein, among others.

Georgia Museum of Art

Peter Blume (American, b. Russia, 1906 – 1992), study for “South of Scranton,” 1930. Oil on canvas, 28 × 20 inches. Vero Beach Museum of Art, Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Athena Society, 2017.2 © 2021 The Educational Alliance, Inc. / Estate of Peter Blume / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

“Extra Ordinary” also emphasizes, in critic Clement Greenberg’s words, “the extreme eclecticism now prevailing” in the American art world during this period. In so doing, it highlights a wider constellation of artists — including such women as Gertrude Abercrombie and Honoré Sharrer, such artists of color as Eldzier Cortor and Hughie Lee-Smith, and other artists from farther-flung regions such as Everett Spruce and Patrick Sullivan — who also turned to the mysterious, supernatural and hyperreal to examine key social issues including the dignity of the working class, wartime trauma and environmental concerns. These artists embraced magic or fantasy not as a means to escape everyday reality but as a way to engage more directly with it.




Although the exhibition is not traveling, the museum is publishing a hardcover catalogue to accompany it, with essays by Richmond-Moll and scholar Philip Eliasoph and catalogue entries on every work in the show by scholars including Richmond-Moll, William U. Eiland (the museum’s director), David A. Lewis (professor of art history at Stephen F. Austin State University), Maurita N. Poole (director and curator at Clark Atlanta University Art Museum) and Akela Reason (associate professor of history and director of museum studies at the University of Georgia).



Great article, lots more images

    Wednesday, May 5, 2021

    Christie’s American Art Live Auction Live Auction: May 18


    Norman Rockwell (1894–1978)
    Jeff Raleigh's Piano Solo ("'Oh Lord,' Jeff said prayerfully, 'I wish Alice was here. Oh, I wish she could hear this…'") (The Virtuoso)
    oil on canvas
    28 ¾ x 22 ¾ in. (73 x 57.8 cm.)
    Painted in 1939.
    $1,200,000-1,800,000

    Christie’s announces its American Art sale on May 18 will present a selection of highlights ranging across the genre from the Hudson River School and art of the American West, to American Illustration and Modernism. The sale will directly follow the 10am live auction Fields of Vision: The Private Collection of Artists Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason which features works from Georgia O’KeeffeRichard Diebenkorn, and Lee Bontecou among others. The exhibition is open by appointment at Christie’s Rockefeller Center galleries May 15-17.

    The American Art sale is highlighted by Norman Rockwell’s Jeff Raleigh’s Piano Solo (“‘Oh Lord,’ Jeff said prayerfully, ‘I wish Alice was here. Oh, I wish she could hear this...’”) (The Virtuoso) which was painted at the precipice of his mature career and published as an illustration for Edmund Ware’s short story “Jeff Raleigh’s Piano Solo” in the May 27, 1939 issue of The Saturday Evening Post (estimate: $1,200,000-1,800,000).  Jeff Raleigh’s Piano Solo embodies the realism, engaging character studies and nostalgic optimism of Rockwell’s best works. Inviting the viewer to also watch in awe as the virtuoso mesmerizes his audience at the piano keys, with help from complex compositional design, the present work beautifully communicates the splendor of the universal language of music in a dynamic and innovative fashion.

    Other standout highlights include N.C. Wyeth’s powerful composition The Guardians, a fusion of Illustration and Western art (estimate: $600,000-800,000), and Winslow Homer’s seaside figural watercolor Startled from the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Irving Levitt, which likely depicts the beach at Coney Island and closely relates to a watercolor of the same title in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (estimate: $600,000-800,000).

    The auction boasts a strong selection of works by the American Modernist Milton Avery, led by his whimsical large-scale painting Startled Goats  (estimate: $400,000-600,000) and elegant Sleeping Nude (estimate: $300,000-500,000). Additional modern highlights include Frozen Lake, Alaska by Rockwell Kent(estimate: $300,000-500,000), which hails from the important collection of Kent’s patron J.J. Ryan, and a 1936 oil by Jackson PollockUntitled (Landscape with Tree to Right) (estimate: $300,000-500,000), that relates to his period studying under Regionalist artist Thomas Hart Benton and demonstrates the emphasis on movement and gesture evident even within his early work.

    From the 19th Century, the sale includes a beautiful selection of works by Hudson River School artists, most notably the work of Sanford Robinson Gifford in Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire (estimate: $300,000-500,000) and A Study of Hunter Mountain at Twilight  (estimate: $200,000-300,000), as well as a handsome portrait of Alexander Hamilton by Eastman Johnson (estimate: $100,000-150,000). John Frederick Kensett’s Study on Long Island Sound at Darien, Connecticut has prestigious provenance including the Amon Carter Museum of American Art and extensive exhibition history such as the Whitney Museum of American Art (estimate: $150,000-250,000).

    Tuesday, May 4, 2021

    In American Waters

    Peabody Essex Museum

    May 29 through October 3, 2021


    Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

    November 6, 2021 through January 31, 2022


    William Formby Halsall (1841-1919) Vigilant in last days Race against Valkyrie, 1893. Oil on canvas, 19 × 29 1/4 in. Gift of Frederic A. Turner, 1961. © 2020 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola

    This May, the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) debuts In American Waters, a painting exhibition that reframes and expands our understanding of American culture and environment by looking at the sea. For over 200 years, American artists have been inspired to capture the beauty, violence, poetry, and transformative power of the sea. The exhibition, on view at PEM in Salem, Massachusetts, from May 29 through October 3, 2021, features a diverse range of modern and historical artists, including Georgia O’Keeffe, Amy Sherald, Kay WalkingStick, Norman Rockwell, Hale Woodruff, Paul Cadmus, Thomas Hart Benton, Jacob Lawrence, Valerie Hegarty, Stuart Davis, and many others. In American Waters is co-organized by PEM and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.

    George Ropes Jr. (1788–1819) Launching of the Ship Fame, 1802. Oil on canvas, 35 3/4 × 46 in. Gift of Captain Nathaniel Silsbee, 1862. Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA. Photography by Jeffrey R. Dykes

    “As this exhibition vigorously asserts, marine painting is so much more than ship portraits. Through more than 90 works, we can trace changing attitudes about the symbolic and emotional resonance of the sea in America and see how contemporary perspectives are informed by marine traditions,” said Dan Finamore, PEM’s Associate Director — Exhibitions and the Russell W. Knight Curator of Maritime Art and History. “No matter where we live, the sea shapes all of our lives and continues to inspire some of the most exciting artists working today.”

    Collaborative and interdisciplinary, In American Waters combines art history, marine history, and even neuroscience to encompass greater geographical breadth, a multiplicity of artists and artistic expressions, and a more inclusive vision for American marine painting and American art more broadly. To these ends, this exhibition is the first to grapple with how attitudes about the sea may manifest in works that are not traditional seascapes. Instead, the experience explores industry and political conflict, sailor culture, visions of the undersea world and abstraction, as well as legacies of the Middle Passage and immigrants’ points of entry.

    Founded in 1799 by the East India Marine Society in Salem, Massachusetts, PEM developed one of the nation’s first and foremost maritime collections. Situated on one of New England’s most historic harbors, the museum has long stewarded, and celebrated the interplay of maritime history and global interconnectivity. Exhibition co-organizer, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, was founded in 2011 in the Ozarks. The region surrounding Bentonville, Arkansas, is known for its abundant waterways in the form of springs, creeks, lakes and rivers, most notably the White River that originates from the Boston Mountains of Northwest Arkansas and ultimately feeds into the mighty Mississippi River, which flows to the Gulf of Mexico.

    James Bard (1815-1897) Steamer Syracuse, 1857. Oil on canvas, 29 1/4 × 51 1/4 in. Gift of the estate of Francis B. C. Bradlee, 1928. © 2020 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola

    Even before marine art was produced in America, seascape paintings were included among items imported from Europe to decorate American homes in the latest style. Later, artists developed a distinctively American vision of the sea with an independent artistic identity.

    The first artist in the United States to declare a specialty in marine subjects was Michele Felice Cornè. Cornè left Naples on Elias Hasket Derby’s ship, Mount Vernon, in 1799, bound for Salem, Massachusetts. Upon arrival, he became a kind of artist-in-residence to the local shipowners, painting vessel portraits and historical and allegorical images in oils and gouache. Cornè’s Ship America on the Grand Banks depicts the first of four ships so named by Salem’s Crowninshield family between Independence and the War of 1812. It was the last British war prize taken by colonial privateers during the American Revolution. Cornè portrays the renamed ship in the international waters of the Grand Banks fishing grounds off of Newfoundland amid French and British flagged vessels. The history of the ship and its prominent American flag, set within a competitive commercial setting, evokes pride in the new nation and its emerging international profile.

    William Bradford (1823-1892) Icebound Ship, about 1880. Oil on canvas, 30 × 48 1/8 in. © 2020 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola

    “To look anew at American marine painting, we studied and analyzed its colonial and Eurocentric origins and found that the genre is far more dynamic and broad than previously assumed,” said Austen Barron Bailly, Chief Curator at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. “When we think of marine painting we may think of high-seas realism and faithful portraits of ships but, as this exhibition attests, in practice we see broad-ranging expressions of American ambition, opportunity, and invention.”

    Artists have long crafted narratives of deepwater activities that take place far beyond America’s shores, extending the image of the nation’s engagement with the world into mid-ocean and beyond. Captain of a whaling fleet, John Bertonccini was also an artist who was said to paint at every opportunity, even using the ship’s paint supplies when his own ran out. In the 1890s his fleet traveled into Arctic waters off the Yukon’s north coast in pursuit of their prey, allowing their ships to freeze into the ice so they could winter over rather than make the long journey home each year. In a new work to enter PEM's collection, the artist created a birds’-eye view of their winter grounds showing the crew playing soccer and baseball to pass the time.

    John Bertonccini (1872 – 1947) Whaling vessels in the Ice, Herschel Island, about 1894-95. Oil on canvas, 18 x 31 in. © 2020 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola

    One of the few Native American women artists making marine paintings today, Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee Nation) expands American marine art traditions, evoking the seascapes of impressionist Childe Hassam and his response to Appledore Island located seven miles off the coast of New Hampshire, and modernists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, who was drawn to re-envision the experiences on nearby shores at Maine. WalkingStick’s 2020 painting, New Hampshire Coast, pictures a location along the shoreline near present day Portsmouth. The artist honors the unbroken connections between coastal waters and the Abenaki community of the Wabanaki Confederacy. Her own pattern of composite Native American basket motifs permeates the rocky shore, reminding us that these are Indigenous lands and waters.

    Childe Hassam (1859–1935) East Headland, Appledore, Isles of Shoals, 1911. Oil on canvas, 30 × 36 in. Gift of Peter S. Lynch in memory of Carolyn A. Lynch, 2018. Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts. Photography by Kathy Tarantola.

    Amy Sherald continues the evolution of American marine painting with her 2019 painting, Precious jewels by the sea, a grand portrayal of four Black teenagers on a beach. Two boys stand tall with girls seated on their shoulders. They tower above a placid turquoise sea and the deep blue horizon. Their long shadows angle and cast over and beyond their red-and-white striped beach umbrella and straw picnic basket on the sand.

    Mass appeal of the seascape and of the artist herself, who was the official portraitist of First Lady Michelle Obama, are central to this work. Sherald seeks to convey an expression of freedom. As the artist recently described, “I make these images of things that we normally do but we don’t get to see in spaces like museums. Like black people going to the beach. . . . It makes me think about my mother. She didn’t know how to swim, and she didn’t like going to the segregated black beaches because she wanted to go to the prettier white beaches. It makes me think about how much things have changed generationally. . . . So it’s really just about creating American narratives about American people — while critiquing it at the same time.”

    Today the sea is on the minds of Americans, in part, because of sea-level rise and the impact of associated climate events on coastal communities and beyond. More than 90 percent of the world’s commerce travels by sea and it’s no coincidence that most major American cities are situated on waterways — whether around protected coastal harbors or inland at the confluence of major rivers.

    Kay WalkingStick, New Hampshire Coast, 2020. Oil on panel. Collection of the artist. ©Kay WalkingStick. Courtesy of the Artist. Photography by Rich Schultz.

    Artists have reflected Americans’ understanding of this significance and of the sea as a connector. Maritime paintings are a multisensory experience. For viewers in any part of the world, these works are particularly adept at evoking sonic qualities — the relentlessly repetitive crashing of surf upon a beach, sailors calling out to one another from a ship’s deck or high in the rigging. The noises of human activity such as the tolling of bells, laborers’ chanteys, and cannon fire can register the same emotional power as that of the open ocean with only the wind and waves. These sounds and sights, and the art they inspire, have the power to transport us.

    The exhibition travels to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, November 6, 2021 through January 31, 2022.




    Published by the Peabody Essex Museum, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and the University of Arkansas Press, a related publication, In American Waters: The Sea in American Painting, highlights American art historical and cultural traditions associated with the sea, deepening our understanding of it as a symbol of American ambition, opportunity, and invention. Edited by Daniel Finamore, PEM’s Associate Director — Exhibitions and The Russell W. Knight Curator of Maritime Art and History, and Austen Barron Bailly, Chief Curator at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, this 240-page book includes more than 120 images, featuring fascinating historical paintings alongside works by major modern and contemporary artists. With contributions by Austen Barron Bailly, Mindy N. Besaw, Sarah N. Chasse, Daniel Finamore, and George H. Schwartz.  

    In American Waters highlights American art historical and cultural traditions associated with the sea, deepening our understanding of it as a symbol of American ambition, opportunity, and invention. The histories of American art have long privileged ways of imagining American culture that only tell a partial story and that overlook narratives of national and individual experience past and present. This ambitious volume reveals the sea as an expansive way to reflect on American culture and environment and to question what it means to be “in American waters.”

    For more than 200 years, American painters have been inspired to capture the beauty, violence, poetry, and transformative power of the sea in American life. Their images of the sea have also expressed ambitions beyond America’s borders in aesthetically and conceptually distinctive ways. The eight essays included here offer a more inclusive way of thinking about American marine painting by reconsidering national symbols and narratives, origin stories, coastlines, horizons, and ports, and broadening the conversation to embrace perspectives on the Middle Passage, immigration, and Indigenous presence. Lavishly illustrated with more than 120 images, In American Waters features fascinating historical paintings alongside works by major modern and contemporary artists.

    Monday, May 3, 2021

    Art History News - April

     Pablo Picasso's Femme assise près d’une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse), Christie's May 20th

    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 day ago
    PABLO PICASSO *Femme assise près d’une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse)* oil on canvas 57 ½ x 44 ⅞ in. (146 x 114 cm.) Painted in Boisgeloup on 30 October 1932 NEW YORK – On 13 May, Christie’s newly introduced 20th Century Evening Sale in New York will be highlighted by Pablo Picasso’s *Femme assise près d’une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse)*, 30 October 1932 (estimate in the region of $55 million). One of the extraordinary series of iconic portraits that Picasso painted of his golden-haired muse during this landmark year, this monumental work is among the most stately and impressive depictions...
    Books: Artemisia Gentileschi; Thomas Gainsborough
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 day ago

    Getty Publications has released two new titles in the *Lives of the Artists *series, which offers illuminating accounts of major artists as viewed by their contemporaries. Lives of Artemisia Gentileschi. By Artemisia Gentileschi, Orazio Gentileschi, Cristofano Bronzini, Pierantonio Stiattesi, Filippo Baldinucci, Averardo de’ Medici and Alessandro Morrona. Introduction by Sheila Barker. J. Paul Getty Museum Lives of Gainsborough. By Philip Thicknesse, William Jackson, and Sir Joshua Reynolds. Introduction by Anthony Mould. J. Paul Getty Museum. *Lives of Artemisia Gentileschi* pre...
    Nellie Mae Rowe
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 4 days ago

    Nellie Mae Rowe, Untitled (Dandy), 1978–1982, crayon and pencil on paper, 24 x 18 inches, gift of Harvie and Charles Abney.*High Museum of Art*Nellie Mae Rowe (American, 1900-1982), "When I Was a Little Girl," 1978, crayon, marker, colored pencil, and pencil on paper, 19 x 24, inches, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, purchase with Folk Art Acquisition Fund, 2002.73. © 2021 Estate of Nellie Mae Rowe/ARS, NY. Melinda Blauvelt, Nellie Mae Rowe, Vinings, Georgia 1971, printed 2021, silver gelatin print, 20 x 24 inches, gift of the artist.*High Museum of Art* Nellie Mae Rowe, Real Girl, 1...
    Two exhibitions can be seen together of David Hockney’s work
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 4 days ago

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    THE PARIS OF BRASSAÏ. PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CITY PICASSO LOVED
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 4 days ago

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    Vincent van Gogh’s spectacular landscape highlights Christie’s New York sale 13 May
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 4 days ago
    Property from an Important Private European Collection VINCENT VAN GOGH (1853-1890) *Le pont de Trinquetaille* oil on canvas 25½ x 31¾ in. (65 x 81 cm.) Painted in Arles *circa* 17 June 1888. $25,000,000-35,000,000 Christie’s will present Vincent van Gogh’s spectacular landscape *Le pont de Trinquetaille* as a highlight of the *20th Century Evening Sale* at Christie’s New York on 13 May ($25,000,000-35,000,000). Painted during Van Gogh’s pivotal fifteen-month stay in Arles, situated on the Rhône River in the Provence region of Southern France, *Le pont de Trinquetaille* wi...
    Van Gogh and the Olive Groves
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 5 days ago

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    The Smithsonian American Art Museum exhibitions
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago

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    America’s Impressionism: Echoes of a Revolution
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago

    Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Memphis (now through May 9, 2021) San Antonio Museum of Art (June 11–September 5, 2021) Brandywine River Museum of Art, Chadds Ford, PA (October 9, 2021–January 9, 2022) Willard Metcalf (American, 1858 – 1925) Poppy Field (Landscape at Giverny) , 1886. Oil on canvas, 10 5/8 x 18 5/16 inches. Collection of J. Jeffrey and Ann Maire Fox.*Image courtesy Questroyal Fine Art*Theodore Robinson (1852 – 1896) Yacht Club Basin, Cos Cob Harbor , 1894. Oil on board, 19 x 22 1/2 in. Brandywine River Museum of Art, Richard M. Scaife BequestEmma Richardson Che...
    GRAFIK! Five Centuries of German and Austrian Graphics
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago
    *Montreal Museum of Fine Arts * *February 11 – July 3, 2021 * Erich Heckel (1883-1970), Portrait of a Man, 1919, woodcut. In process of acquisition. © Estate of Erich Heckel / SOCAN (2021). Photo MMFA, Christine Guest ] Martin Schongauer (1440/50-1491), The Entombment, about 1480, engraving, only state. MMFA, purchase, anonymous fund Hans Makart (1840-1884), The Abduction / Death and the Maiden, about 1863, pen and ink, ink wash, grattage, pastel (?), graphi...
    Rembrandt, Monet, Picasso - Old Master Through Modern Prints: Swann May 6
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago
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    Soutine / de Kooning: Conversations in Paint
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago

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    20th Century Evening Sale at Christie’s New York on May 11, 2021: Rothko, Seurat
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago

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    Twenty-seven new acquisitions by the three generations of Wyeth painters, N.C., Andrew, and Jamie Wyeth
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago

    The Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland, Maine, has announced the receipt of major gifts of art from the bequest of Betsy James Wyeth. The bequest of twenty-seven works includes two well-known Andrew Wyeth watercolors featuring the Olson House—*Room after Room* Andrew Wyeth (American, 1917-2009), Geraniums, 1960. Drybrush watercolor on paper, 20.75 x 15.5 inches. and *Geraniums*; the N.C. Wyeth oil painting *Fisherman’s Family*; as well as Jamie Wyeth’s famed Monhegan oil painting *Islander*. The new works will be included in an exhibition entitled *Betsy’s Gift: The Works of ...
    Sotheby’s Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale 12 May
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago

    One of Claude Monet’s finest large-scale Water Lilies paintings ever to appear at auction will star in Sotheby’s Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale on 12 May in New York. Estimated in the region of $40 million, Le Bassin aux Nymphéas stands among the most iconic and celebrated Impressionist images. Measuring nearly 40 by 79 inches, this enrapturing canvas from 1917-19 was conceived as part of the artist’s legendary series of monumental paintings depicting his water lily pond at Giverny, the Grandes Décorations, which he began in 1914 and examples of which can be found today...
    , Sotheby’s will present bold masterworks from the 1980s by David Hockney and Willem de Kooning
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 1 week ago

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    Book - HOW BEN SHAHN FOUGHT FOR JUSTICE WITH ART
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 3 weeks ago

    - *THE PEOPLE'S PAINTER HOW BEN SHAHN FOUGHT FOR JUSTICE WITH ARTBy Cynthia Levinson* - - Illustrator Evan Turk - *Imprint: *Abrams Books for Young Readers - *Publication Date:* April 20, 2021 - *Price: *$18.99 - *Trim Size:* 10 x 10 - *ISBN:* 978-1-4197-4130-2 - *EAN: *9781419741302 - *Page Count: *48 - *Illustrations: *Full-color illustrations throughout - *Format: *Hardcover - *Rights:* World/All - *Additional formats: *Ebook - *A lyrically told, exquisitely illustrated biography of influential Jewish artist and a...
    Art History News - February - March
    Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 4 weeks ago

    AUGUSTA SAVAGE: RENAISSANCE WOMAN Jonathan Kantrowitz, Art History News - 20 hours ago Great article: https://artdaily.cc/news/134379/The-Black-woman-artist-who-crafted-a-life-she-was-told-she-couldn-t-have#.YGTBItXwZoE Also see https://www.nyhistory.org/exhibitions/augusta-savage-renaissance-woman Organized by guest curator Jeffreen M. Hayes, Ph.D., the Augusta Savage: Renaissance Woman exhibition features nearly 80 works of art, including sculptures, paintings, and works on paper, and is the first to reassess Harlem Renaissance artist Augusta Savage’s contributions to art and ...

    Saturday, May 1, 2021

    Pablo Picasso's Femme assise près d’une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse), Christie's May 20th


    PABLO PICASSO

    Femme assise près d’une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse)
     oil on canvas

    57 ½ x 44 ⅞ in. (146 x 114 cm.)

    Painted in Boisgeloup on 30 October 1932

    NEW YORK – On 13 May, Christie’s newly introduced 20th Century Evening Sale in New York will be highlighted by Pablo Picasso’s Femme assise près d’une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse), 30 October 1932 (estimate in the region of $55 million). One of the extraordinary series of iconic portraits that Picasso painted of his golden-haired muse during this landmark year, this monumental work is among the most stately and impressive depictions of Marie-Thérèse that the artist painted.

    Vanessa FuscoCo-Head of the 20th Century Evening Sale, remarked: “From the defining series that introduced Marie-Thérèse to the public eye, Femme assise près d'une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse) was painted during a seminal year in which Picasso crafted a new pictorial language to depict his muse and lover. This striking, monumental portrait was last seen publicly in the superb exhibition devoted to the artist’s “year of wonders,” Picasso 1932, at the Musée Picasso, Paris and Tate Modern, London in 2017-2018. As one of the most ground-breaking and influential artists of the 20th Century, it is only fitting that this exceptional painting will lead the inaugural newly formatted 20th Century Art Evening Sale at Christie’s.

    Painted in Boisgeloup on 30 October 1932, Femme assise près d’une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse) crowns this great series of 1932 masterpieces. By this time, Marie-Thérèse had risen to ascendance in every area of her lover’s output. In the present work, she has claimed absolute command, an idolized muse now reigning deity-like over the artist and his creation.

    Here, Picasso has presented Marie-Thérèse as a winged goddess, a modern-day Nike, her head lunar, luminous and sculptural as if carved from marble, and yet her body sensuous and soft, orbiting around her fiery red torso. No more the languorously reclining nude lost in a private reverie, in the present portrait she is clothed, alert and upright, her omniscient gaze demonstrating that she is in complete command of her subjects, the artist, her lover, clearly captive to her thrall.

    The year 1932 witnessed the extraordinary outpouring of large-scale, color-filled, rhapsodic depictions of Marie-Thérèse. Having deified her statuesque forms and classical profile in the great series of plaster busts the year prior, Picasso allowed the influence of his young mistress and the bliss in which he found himself, fill his painting. Pictured both seated and reclining, this series saw Picasso perform artistic alchemy with these two revered motifs. With this great succession of paintings—which includes works such as Le RêveNude, Green Leaves, and BustLe Lecture (Musée Picasso, Paris), and Jeune fille devant le miroir (The Museum of Modern Art, New York) —Picasso reached the height of his artistic powers. “There is no doubt,” William Rubin declared, “that 1932 marks the peak of fever-pitch intensity and achievement, a year of rapturous masterpieces that reach a new and unfamiliar summit in both his painting and sculpture.”

    Books: Artemisia Gentileschi; Thomas Gainsborough

     Getty Publications has released two new titles in the Lives of the Artists series, which offers illuminating accounts of major artists as viewed by their contemporaries.


    Lives of Artemisia Gentileschi. By Artemisia Gentileschi, Orazio Gentileschi, Cristofano Bronzini, Pierantonio Stiattesi, Filippo Baldinucci, Averardo de’ Medici and Alessandro Morrona. Introduction by Sheila Barker. J. Paul Getty Museum
    Lives of Gainsborough. By Philip Thicknesse, William Jackson, and Sir Joshua Reynolds. Introduction by Anthony Mould. J. Paul Getty Museum.

    Lives of Artemisia Gentileschi presents a fascinating look at the famous Baroque artist and one of the most celebrated painters of 17th-century Italy. Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–after 1654) was known for the naturalism with which she depicted the female body and for her use of rich colors and chiaroscuro. Born in Rome, she was trained by her father, the painter Orazio Gentileschi, and was working professionally by the time she was a teenager. In a period when women artists very rarely achieved success in their field, she was commissioned by royalty across Europe and was the first woman to become a member of Florence’s prestigious Accademia delle Arti del Disegno, later becoming an educator in the arts.

    Providing further insight into the extraordinary life of this trailblazing artist, this volume presents an absorbing collection of letters, biographies, and court testimonies, several of which are published here in English for the first time. The vivid illustrations include three works that have only recently been attributed to Gentileschi, as well as Lucretia (about 1627), which was recently acquired by the J. Paul Getty Museum.

    An introduction by Sheila Barker, founding director of the Jane Fortune Research Program on Women Artists in the Age of the Medici, contextualizes these texts and discusses Gentileschi’s legacy.

    Lives of Gainsborough provides an overview of the life and work of the English painter Thomas Gainsborough. Gainsborough (1727–1788) was a leading English landscape and portrait painter, draftsman, and printmaker who is now considered to be one of the most important British artists of the eighteenth century. This volume illuminates his life, career, personality, and passions through the perspectives of three individuals close to the artist. We hear from Philip Thicknesse, a British adventurer, writer, businessman, and soldier; William Jackson; and Sir Joshua Reynolds, an English portrait painter and the first president of the Royal Academy of Arts. An obituary published shortly after Gainsborough’s death lends insight into the artist’s impact. An introduction by Anthony Mould, a British art dealer and independent scholar, offers a comprehensive and detailed overview of Gainsborough’s life and career.

    Previously published volumes in this series include: Lives of Rembrandt, Lives of Giovanni Bellini, A Memoir of Vincent van Gogh, Looking at Manet, Recollections of Henri Rousseau, Auguste Rodin, The Life of Michelangelo, The Life of Raphael, Julia Margaret Cameron, Lives of Velázquez, Lives of Tintoretto, Lives of Titian, Memories of Degas, Lives of Leonardo da Vinci, Lives of Caravaggio, Lives of Rubens, Anecdotes of William Hogarth, A Memoir of Samuel Palmer, and Lives of William Blake.