Tuesday, July 28, 2015

The American Spirit: Painting and Sculpture from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art

On view June 13 through September 6, 2015 at the Tampa Museum of Art

Between the 1830s and the end of the First World War, American art came into its own. From the majestic Hudson River School paintings of Thomas Cole, John Kensett, and Albert Bierstadt to the gritty urban realism of Robert Henri and John Sloan, this presentation draws on the rich holdings of American paintings and sculptures in the collection of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

This selection of more than 50 paintings and eight sculptures highlights the maturation of a distinctly American idiom, one informed by international currents and engaged with capturing the fluxes of modern life. Masterpieces of landscape, genre, still-life, and portraiture, punctuated by a selection of sculptures, trace an evolution in style from an art driven by the mandates of westward expansion to one animated by experimentation. In both idealized and naturalistically rendered landscapes, in scenes of everyday life, or meticulously detailed images of everyday objects, the presentation also narrates an important chapter in American cultural history that witnessed the Civil War and its aftermath, the expansion of national boundaries and the closing of the western frontier, and the transformations wrought by the emergence of new technologies at the dawn of the 20th century.

This exhibition has been organized by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.


From an excellent review in the Tampa Bay Times (some images added):


By the end of the 19th century, landscape paintings such as


George Inness' Morning, Catskill Valley and its flaming autumn trees inject a more overt spirituality.

Though sentimentality was a hallmark of many narrative or genre works of the time, they began also to address the reality of a growing urban underclass, a combination seen in


John George Brown's Boy Fishing and


Charles Blauvelt's portrait of an immigrant in Homeward Bound From New York.


John George Brown (British, active USA, 1831-1913), Pull for the Shore, n.d., Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 3/4 in., Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Gifts from the Estate of Mrs. Stanley McCormick, Norman Hirschl and the American Federation of Arts to the Preston Morton Collection by exchange 1971.18

In Brown's Pull for Shore, the men in a rowboat are presented in a more straightforward way, but avoiding the bleak realities that existed for poor working people...
"Cosmopolitanism in the Gilded Age" gives us the upside of all the new money at the turn of the century.

A Childe Hassam painting of The Manhattan Club and the swells walking around it, the


Interior of His Brother's House in Boston, by Walter Gay and

William Merritt Chase's The Lady in Pink (Portrait of the artist's wife), 1886 all excellent, aren't voyeuristic (they were painted at a time when those who would have seen them were social equals) or aspirational (ditto).

Combining works representing the "Closing of the Frontier" and those for the "Dawn of Mass Entertainment" into a single theme was a stretch for me in some instances, but I appreciated the unexpected juxtapositions. Frederic Remington's heroic bronze mountain man (1903) seems a long way from


Louis Eilshemius's disaffected patrons in the vaguely unsavory painting Plaza Theatre (1915), which calls to mind the Kit Kat Club in Cabaret. They're separated by just 12 years but we see the nostalgia and romance for a vanishing way of life and the strengths of individualism contrasted with a competing cynicism and sense of isolation.

The show ends with an homage to the Eight, a group of early 20th century artists who participated in a controversial exhibition in 1908...



Robert Henri (American, 1865-1929), Derricks on the North River, 1902, Oil on canvas, 26 x 32 in., Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Museum purchase for the Preston Morton Collection, with funds provided by the Chalifoux Fund 1977.45
As Henri wrote: "Paint should be as real as mud." His Derricks on the North River is a far cry from the Manhattan Club.



So is George Bellows' Steaming Streets, another dark urban landscape in which a trolley, spooked horse and onlookers combine. (Bellows wasn't in the Eight show but was an important part of Henri's circle.) Among other artists who weren't as tight with the Ashcans that were included in the Eight show was Maurice Prendergast; his Summer in the Park is a bright frolic composed of paint dashes that have no resemblance to mud.
More from the exhibition:




Albert Bierstadt (German, active USA, 1830-1902), Mirror Lake, Yosemite Valley, 1864, Oil on canvas, 21 3/4 x 30 1/8 in., Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Gift of Mrs. Sterling Morton for the Preston Morton Collection 1960.51





Thomas Cole, The Meeting of the Waters, 1847, oil on canvas.
51 x 75 3/4"

Gift of Suzette Morton Davidson to the Preston Morton Collection
1979.19





John Frederick Kensett
USA, 1816-1872
View of the Beach At Beverly, Massachusetts, 1860
Oil on canvas
14 1/4 x 24 1/4"

Gift of Mrs. Sterling Morton to the Preston Morton Collection
1960.68  





John Sloan
USA, 1871-1951
City from the Palisades, 1908
Oil on canvas
26 1/8 x 32 1/8"

Gift of Mrs. Sterling Morton to the Preston Morton Collection
1960.82

Carnegie Museum of Art: CMOA Collects Edward Hopper

CMOA Collects Edward Hopper
July 25–October 26, 2015
Gallery One
Edward Hopper; Sailing, 1911; oil on canvas; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal in honor of the Sarah Scaife Gallery; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art
Edward Hopper; Sailing, 1911; oil on canvas; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal in honor of the Sarah Scaife Gallery; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

In 1913, Edward Hopper sold his first painting at the first Armory Show. But it would be over a decade before the now-famed painter sold another. Instead, Hopper turned to etchings, drawings, and watercolors, finding recognition for his masterful compositions of quiet, meditative moments.

Edward Hopper is best known for his paintings of urban modern life in the 20th century, but the artist initially found success with etching. This medium proved to be ideal for his bold graphic compositions and humble American subject matter that included rooftops, railroads, buildings, and landscapes. Gain behind-the-scenes insight into CMOA’s Hopper collection with curator Akemi May, who will discuss this important moment in the artist’s career, famous printmakers like Rembrandt who inspired him, and the watercolors that led to his recognition as a painter.



Edward Hopper; Night Shadows, 1921; etching; Leisser Art Fund; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art
Edward Hopper; Night Shadows, 1921; etching; Leisser Art Fund; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

CMOA Collects Edward Hopper presents all 17 works by Hopper in the museum’s collection, ranging from impressive examples of his etchings, drawings, and watercolors, to the oil paintings for which he is best known. This includes the first painting Hopper sold, Sailing (1911), and his 1936 painting Cape Cod Afternoon, produced after he gained widespread recognition. CMOA Collects Edward Hopper also presents prints by artists who influenced Hopper during his difficult formative years, including Rembrandt, John Sloan, and Charles Meryon.

Edward Hopper; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936; oil on canvas; Patrons Art Fund; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art
Edward Hopper; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936; oil on canvas; Patrons Art Fund; Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art

Never before exhibited together, the works in CMOA Collects Edward Hopper reveal the development of an iconic American master, and shed light on the influences that produced his instantly recognizable style.

Edward Hopper; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926; watercolor over charcoal on paper; Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal; Carnegie Museum of Art
Edward Hopper; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926; watercolor over charcoal on paper; Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal; Carnegie Museum of Art

CMOA Collects Edward Hopper is organized by Akemi May, associate curator of fine art.

More Images:



Edward Hopper, American, 1882-1967, Rocky Pedestal, 1927, watercolor on paper, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty



Irving Penn (1917–2009), known for his iconic fashion, portrait and still life images that appeared in Vogue magazine, ranks as one of the foremost photographers of the 20th century.

“Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty,” the first retrospective of Penn’s work in nearly 20 years, will celebrate his legacy as a modern master and demonstrate the photographer’s continued influence on the medium. The exhibition features work from all stages of Penn’s career—street scenes from the late 1930s, photographs of the American South from the early 1940s, celebrity portraits, fashion photographs, still lifes and more private studio images.

Penn’s pictures reveal a taste for stark simplicity whether he was photographing celebrities, fashion models, still lifes or people in remote places of the world.

“Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty” is drawn entirely from the extensive holdings of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. On display will be 146 photographs from the museum’s permanent collection, including the debut of 100 photographs recently donatedto the museum by The Irving Penn Foundation.

The exhibition presents 48 previously unseen or never exhibited photographs.

“Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty” will be on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum from Oct.23 through March20, 2016, The exhibition will tour nationally following its presentation in Washington, D.C. Confirmed venues include the Dallas Museum of Artin Dallas (April 15, 2016 –Aug.14, 2016); Lesley University, College of Art and Designin Cambridge, Mass.(Sept.10, 2016 –Dec.16, 2016); the Frist SI-321-20153Center for the Visual Artsin Nashville, Tenn.(Feb. 24, 2017 –May 21, 2017); and the Wichita Art Museumin Wichita, Kan.(Sept.30, 2017 –Jan.7, 2018).

In a career that spanned nearly 70 years, Penn’s aesthetic and technical skillearned him accolades in both the artistic and commercial worlds. He was a master of both black-and-white and color photography, and his revival of platinum printing in the 1960s and 1970s was a catalyst for significant change in the art world. He was one of the first photographers to cross the chasm that separated magazine and fine-art photography, narrowing the gap between art and fashion. 

Penn’s portraits and fashion photographs defined elegance in the 1950s, yet throughout his career he also transformed mundane objects—storefront signs, food, cigarette butts, street debris—into memorable images of unexpected, often surreal, beauty.“From his first photographs to the ones he made in the last years of his life, Irving Penn’s consistency of artistic integrity is remarkable,” said Foresta. “He was able to elevate even crushed coffee cups and steel blocks to the realm of great art, printing his images with exacting care. 

But in the final analysis his work is not just about beauty, or about the potentials of photography as an art form, but a combination of the two that is indivisible and unique.

The 100 photographs announced as a donation to the museum in 201 3include rare street photographs from the late 1930s and 1940s, most of which are unpublished; images of post-war Europe; iconic portraits of figures such as Truman Capote, 




Irving Penn, Truman Capote 1979 (3 of 3), New York, 1979, gelatin silver print, Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation


Salvador Dali





 and Leontyne Price;



color photographs made for magazine editorials and commercial advertising; 





Irving Penn, Mouth (for L’Oréal), New York, 1986, Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation
Irving Penn, Mouth (for L’Oréal), New York, 1986, Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation
One of the twentieth century’s best-known American photographers, Irving Penn (1917-2009) was one of the first to break the boundaries between magazine and art photography. Opening on October 15th, this retrospective of Penn’s work—the first in almost twenty years—includes approximately 140 photographs from the American Art Museum’s permanent collection, and debuts 100 photographs recently donated by The Irving Penn Foundation. From the street scenes made in the late 1930s, to his late experimental images (many of them self-portraits), the images in this show reveal Penn’s taste for stark simplicity—a hallmark of his work.
- See more at: http://aspp.com/whats-hanging/irving-penn-beyond-beauty/#sthash.CoILxMFE.dpuf

 

Irving Penn, Mouth (for L’Oréal), New York, 1986, Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation

self-portraits; and some of Penn’s most recognizable fashion and still life photographs.




Irving Penn, Red Rooster, New York, 2003, Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation - See more at: http://aspp.com/whats-hanging/irving-penn-beyond-beauty/#sthash.Fumm3Iyn.dpuf
Irving Penn, Red Rooster, New York, 2003, Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation
Irving Penn, Red Rooster, New York, 2003, Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation
- See more at: http://aspp.com/whats-hanging/irving-penn-beyond-beauty/#sthash.Fumm3Iyn.dpuf


Irving Penn, Dior Black Suit (Tania), Paris, 1950, gelatin silver print Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation
Irving Penn, Mouth (for L’Oréal), New York, 1986, Copyright © by The Irving Penn Foundation - See more at: http://aspp.com/whats-hanging/irving-penn-beyond-beauty/#sthash.bUTq3yIQ.dpuf



Nadja Auermann, Irving Penn Vogue July-1994

 

All the prints were made during the artist’s lifetime and personally approved by him.
 
Publication 



The exhibition is accompanied by a catalog, co-published by The Irving Penn Foundation and the Smithsonian American Art Museum and distributed by Yale University Press, with an essay by Foresta and an introduction by Broun. Foresta’s essay introduces Penn to a younger generation and delves into his use of photography to respond to social and cultural change. 

In Bloom: Painting Flowers in the Age of Impressionism



On July 19, the Denver Art Museum (DAM) opened In Bloom: Painting Flowers in the Age of Impressionism, the centerpiece exhibition for a campus-wide summer celebration. In Bloom explores the development of 19th-centuryFrench floral still-life painting, and features about 60 paintings by world-renowned French artists Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Cézanne, Vincent Van Gogh and others. On view through Oct. 11, 2015, In Bloom will be a ticketed exhibition, and free for museum members. 

The colorful exhibition demonstrates how a traditional genre was reinvented by 19th-century artists, as the art world's focus was shifting to modernism. The exhibition is co-curated by Dr. Heather MacDonald, Getty Foundation and formerly of the Dallas Museum of Art, and Dr. Mitchell Merling, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and curated locally by Angelica Daneo, associate curator of painting and sculpture at the DAM. In Bloom examines the change from meticulous and lush still-life paintings to compositions with looser brush strokes and fewer, unified subjects.

 Organized by the Dallas Museum of Art and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the DAM will serve as the last stop for this exhibition. “When we think of the Impressionists, images of vibrant landscapes come to mind, but in this exhibition our visitors will be able to experience the artists’ ability to capture the fleeting beauty of flower bouquets,” said Daneo. “Increasingly popular since the 1500s, the floral still life was revitalized in France during the 1800s, when artists explored the genre’s technical and artistic potential.” 

In Bloom follows landmark developments in the French floral still-life genre from the late 1700s to the early 1900s. Visitors will receive a foundation for the experiments of the 19th century by starting with the examination of works by masters such as Anne Vallayer-Coster and Pierre-Joseph Redouté. Highlights of the exhibition include productions by artists from the Lyon School, Impressionist still lifes by Camille Pissarro, Edgar Degas and Pierre-Auguste Renoir and post-Impressionist works by Vincent van Gogh. 

The exhibition concludes with pieces by Odilon Redon, Pierre Bonnard and Henri Matisse, who continued the floral still-life tradition as modernism was radically transforming the art world.





Édouard Manet (French, 1832–1883), Flowers in a Crystal Vase, about 1882. Oil on canvas; 12-7⁄8 × 9-5⁄8 in. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.37.



Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890; active in France),Vase with Cornflowers and Poppies, 1887. Oil on canvas; 31-1⁄2 × 26-3⁄8 in. Triton Collection Foundation.



Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890; active in France), Vase with Carnations, summer 1886. Oil on canvas; 18-1⁄8 × 14-3⁄4 in. Collection Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, purchased with the generous support of the Vereniging van Hadendaagse Kunstaankopen, A2235.



Henri Matisse (French, 1869–1954), Still Life: Bouquet and Compotier, 1924. Oil on canvas; 29-1⁄4 × 36-1⁄2 in. Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., in honor of Dr. Bryan Williams. © 2015 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York



Henri Matisse (French, 1869–1954), Still Life with Pascal’s “Pensées,”1924. Oil on canvas; 19-1⁄4 × 25-1⁄8 in. Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Gift of Ruth and Bruce Dayton, 2010.37 © 2015 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York





Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890; active in France), Vase of Flowers, summer 1890. Oil on canvas; 16-9⁄16 × 11-7⁄16 in. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation), S109V/1962.



Paul Cézanne (French, 1839–1906), The Blue Vase, about 1889–90. Oil on canvas; 24 × 19-1⁄16 in. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, Bequest of Comte Isaac de Camondo, 1911, RF 1973 © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY



Paul Gauguin (French, 1848–1903), Still Life with Peonies, 1884. Oil on canvas; 23-1⁄2 × 28-3⁄4 in. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1995.47.10.



Édouard Manet (French, 1832–1883), Vase of White Lilacs and Roses, 1883. Oil on canvas; 22 × 18-1⁄8 in. Dallas Museum of Art, The Wendy and Emery Reves Collection, 1985.R.34



Alfred Sisley (French, 1839–1899), Still Life of Wildflowers, 1875. Oil on canvas; 25-3⁄4 × 19-7⁄8 in. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 85.500.



Henri Fantin-Latour (French, 1836–1904), Asters in a Vase, 1875. Oil on canvas; 22-7⁄8 × 23-1⁄4 in. Saint Louis Art Museum, Museum Purchase, 4:1944.



Henri Fantin-Latour  (French, 1836–1904), Chrysanthemums, about 1889. Oil on canvas; 38-3/8 × 36-5/8 in. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri. Purchase: William Rockhill Nelson Trust.33-15/2. Photo: Jamison Miller   



Camille Pissarro (French, 1831–1903), Bouquet of Flowers, about 1898. Oil on canvas; 21-1⁄4 × 25-3⁄4 in. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Bequest of Marco F. Hellman, 1974.6.



Odilon Redon (French, 1840–1916), Green Plant in an Urn, about 1910–11. Oil on canvas; 33-1⁄2 × 23-5⁄8 in. Musée d’Orsay, Paris, Bequest of Mme ArïRedon in accordance with the wishes of her husband, the artist’s son, 1984, RF 1984 44 © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY



Gustave Caillebotte (French, 1848–1894) Yellow Roses in a Vase, 1882. Oil on canvas; 21 × 18-1⁄4 in. Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., in honor of Janet Kendall Forsythe, 2010.13.McD.# # # 

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Joan Miró: Instinct & Imagination


The Denver Art Museum (DAM) presented Joan Miró: Instinct & Imagination, on view March 22, 2015 through June 28, 2015. The exhibition focused on the remarkable inventions of this Spanish artist during the last two decades of his life,starting in the 1960s, with a special emphasis on paintings, sculptures and drawings. During this time,Miróc ontinued the inventive, freely developed forms for which he is known, and began exploring newmaterialsincluding bronze. 

The exhibition had been organized by the Seattle Art Museum and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (MNCARS) in Madrid, featuring more than 50 artworks created between 1963 and1981, and entirely drawn from the MNCARS collection.

The traveling exhibition was previouslyon view at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University from Sept. 11, 2014–Feb. 22, 2015and at the Seattle Art Museum in early 2014.

Good review of the exhibition and Miro's works.


Exhibition Catalogue

An exhibition catalogue was published by the Seattle Art Museum in collaboration with the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía and in association with Yale University Press, New Haven and London.




Miró: The Experience of Seeing includes color illustrations of nearly 50 paintings, drawings, and sculptures that show the breadth and contrast of this body of work—from bold, colorful canvases with expressive gestures to the most minimal calligraphic markings on white fields. His sculptures made of found objects are a revelation. Comparisons between paintings and sculptures highlight startling connections between shapes and symbols that Miró used in each medium. These mature works represent the culmination of the artist’s development of an innovative and personal visual language. Engaging texts, including a contribution by noted Spanish filmmaker Pere Portabella, explain Miró’s role as a political figure and his quest to speak about the most intangible subjects through the materiality of objects and the painted gesture. This important new examination of Miró’s later work allows for a richer, deeper understanding of this significant modern artist’s distinguished career.



Joan Miró, Woman, Bird,and Star (Homage to Pablo Picasso) (Femme, oiseau, étoile [Homenatge a Pablo Picasso]),Feb. 15, 1966/April 3-8, 1973. Oil paint on canvas; overall: 96-7/16 × 66-15/16 in., Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris, 2015.




Joan Miró, Woman Entranced by the Escape of Shooting Stars (Femme en transe par la fuite des étoiles filantes), 1969. Acrylic paint on canvas; overall: 76-3/4 × 51-3/16 in. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris, 2015.



Joan Miró, Passage/Landscape (Paysage), 1974.Acrylic paint and chalk on canvas; overall: 96-1/16 × 67-1/2 in. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris, 2015.



Joan Miró, Head, Bird (Tête, oiseau),1977. Lithographic ink and acrylic paint on Barker paper; overall:23 x 31 in., Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris, 2015.



Joan Miró, Bird Woman II (Femme oiseau II),1977. Oil paint on canvas; overall:77 x 51in., Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris, 2015.




Joan Miró, Spanish Woman Femme espagnole),1974. Oil paint on canvas; overall:57 x 45in., Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris, 2015..orgImages available upon request.