Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Lorenzo Lotto Portraits

National Gallery London 
5 November 2018 – 10 February 2019

“Lotto was the first Italian painter who was sensitive to the varying status of the human soul. Never before or since has anyone brought out on the face more of the inner life….” Bernard Berenson, art historian, 1895

In autumn 2018 the National Gallery will stage the first-ever exhibition of portraits by the Italian Renaissance artist Lorenzo Lotto.

Lorenzo Lotto Portraits will bring together many of Lotto’s best portraits spanning his entire career from collections around the world.

Lorenzo Lotto, 'Portrait of Marsilio Cassotti and his wife Faustina', 1523 © Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid
Lorenzo Lotto, 'Portrait of Marsilio Cassotti and his wife Faustina', 1523 © Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

 Image result for Lotto Bishop Bernardo de‘ Rossi

These include such masterpieces as the 'Bishop Bernardo de‘ Rossi' (1505) from the Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte in Naples,

 


united with its striking allegorical cover from the National Gallery of Art, Washington;



Image result

 Image result

Image result

and the monumental altarpiece of 'The Alms of Saint Antoninus of Florence' (1540–2) from the Basilica Santi Giovanni e Paulo in Venice coming to the UK for the first time. In this painting Lotto not only inserted portraits of members of the commissioning confraternity, but also, highly unusually, paid poor people to sit for him.

Working during a time of profound change in Europe, Lotto was remarkable for depicting a wide variety of middle-class sitters, including clerics, merchants, artisans, and humanists.

He portrayed men, women, and children in compositions rich with symbolism and great psychological depth. His works are characterised by expressive sensitivity and immediacy and are also known for their deeply saturated colours and luxuriant handling of paint.

Born in Venice, Lotto travelled extensively and worked in different parts of Italy, most notably Treviso, Bergamo, Venice, and the Italian Marches. He spent his final years as a lay member of the confraternity of the Holy House at Loreto (1549–56.)  In today’s terms, his disposition in the later decades of his life would probably be described as clinically depressed. A melancholic empathy with his sitters is evident in his in late portraits.

Staged broadly chronologically the exhibition starts with Lotto’s earliest portraits before exploring the work from his most significant periods in Bergamo and Venice and ending with the late paintings. Unusually for a National Gallery exhibition objects related to those he depicted will also be displayed.

Room one explores Lotto’s work from his time in Treviso (1503–6) and includes the 'Allegory' (1505)  from the National Gallery of Art, Washington (above)

Image result

and the spectacular 'Assumption of the Virgin with Saints Anthony Abbot and Louis of Toulouse' (1506) from the Chiesa Prepositurale e Collegiata di Santa Maria Assunta, Asolo.

Lotto, ritratto di lucina brembati.jpg

Focusing on his Bergamasque period (1513–25), Room two contains the cleverly symbolic 'Lucina Brembati'  (about 1520–3)]

 Lorenzo Lotto - The Mystic Marriage of St Catherine - WGA13684.jpg

 and 'The Mystic Marriage of Saint Catherine of Alexandria, with Niccolò Bonghi' (1523) both from Bergamo’s Accademia Carrara;

 Image result

as well as the 'Portrait of a Married Couple' (1523–4) from the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, which has been cleaned on the occasion of the exhibition.

Room three is dedicated to works produced in Venice (1525–49)

Andrea Odoni (1527); Lorenzo Lotto.JPG

such as the famous likeness of the Venetian collector 'Andrea Odoni' from the Royal Collection (1527),
 Image result

the National Gallery’s own Portrait of a Woman inspired by Lucretia

 Image result

and the 'Portrait of a Young Man with a Lizard' (1528–30) from the Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice.

The final room celebrates the late work and includes the remarkably well preserved and affecting 'Portrait of a Man with a Felt Hat' (1541?) from the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, as well as the altarpiece of 'The Alms of Saint Antoninus  of Florence' (1540–2).

Objects relating to the portraits will show how the meaning of Lotto’s paintings extends from the sitter to their surroundings. Lotto painted these not so much to reflect a given sitter’s opulence and wealth, but to help tell their story and reflect their identity. Among items on display will be a carpet, sculpture, jewellery, clothing, and books.


Lorenzo Lotto, Portrait of a Young Man, about 1500 (detail). Oil on panel, 34.2 × 27.9 cm. Accademia Carrara, Bergamo © Fondazione Accademia Carrara, Bergamo.

Lotto’s reputation has consistently grown since the art historian Bernard Berenson published the first monograph on him in 1895. Writing during the emergence of Freudian psychoanalysis, Berenson saw Lotto as the first modern portraitist because of his interest in reflecting his sitters’ states of mind.
“He seems always to have been able to define his feelings, emotions and ideals, instead of being a mere highway for them,” said Berenson, “this makes him pre-eminently a psychologist…The portraits all have the interest of personal confessions.”

Matthias Wivel, Curator of 16th-century Italian Paintings at the National Gallery, and curator of Lorenzo Lotto Portraits, says:

“Lotto’s empathetic approach to his sitters, his attention to detail and his willingness to explore new formats and ways of composing portraits all contribute to a body of work that is astonishingly varied and feels more direct, less filtered, than those of his contemporaries notably Titian’s more elevated, idealised portraiture. Lotto portrayed people from an unusually wide variety of social backgrounds. His attention to clothes and objects in his paintings helps acutely to define the sitter’s identity, social status and aspirations; and the psychological interest he brings to his portraits is of the highest order – no two subjects appear similar and there is a sense of understanding what makes each sitter tick.”

Director of the National Gallery, Dr Gabriele Finaldi, says:

“A contemporary of Titian, Lotto was one of the most original portrait painters of the Renaissance. The scholars and merchants, artisans and clerics and the family groups he depicted are vibrant with personality and psychological depth. Five centuries on they come alive before us in all their human complexity.”

'Lorenzo Lotto Portraits' is organised by the National Gallery and the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

'Lorenzo Lotto Portraits' is curated by Matthias Wivel, with Miguel Falomir of the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid and Enrico Maria dal Pozzolo.

Fernand Léger: New Times, New Pleasures

Tate Liverpool
3 NOVEMBER 2018 – 17 MARCH 2019
  

VAM - Institut Valencià d'Art Modern 
2 May to 15 September 2019.

 
Tate Liverpool presents the first major UK exhibition in 30 years of renowned modern artist Fernand Léger (1881–1955). Fernand Léger: New Times, New Pleasures brings together more than 50 paintings from across Europe, including many never before seen in the UK. 

Featuring abstract and figurative paintings, drawings, a large-scale mural, films, graphic design, books and textiles, the exhibition explores how Léger redefined the value of art to 20th century society. Creating works in a diverse range of media, Léger was a politically-engaged artist, with an unwavering belief in the social function of art for everyone. Influenced by his early training as an architect, Léger developed a unique visual style that powerfully captured the intense experience and energy of the 1910s Parisian metropolis in which he lived. At a time when photography and new forms of visual communication became predominant, Léger’s artistic style became heavily influenced by street advertising; like posters and neon signs, his paintings made bold, graphic and colourful statements about the bustle and rhythm of modern life. 

Highlights of this seminal period of Léger’s career include, 



trait
Fernand Léger
The Disc (Le Disque) 1918
Fernand Léger
The Disc (Le Disque) 1918
Oil paint on canvas
650 x 540 mm
Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018. Provenance: Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

The Disc1918 


Fernand Léger
(1920)
The Tugboat
Crédit photographique : Ville de Grenoble/Musée de Grenoble - Jean-Luc Lacroix
and The Tugboat1920 where the pure elements of abstract painting – line, form, colour – are used to embody industrial modernity. His interest and admiration for cinema also influenced his work, specifically his experimental film Ballet Mécanique1924, made in collaboration with director, Dudley Murphy, artist, Man Ray and with music by George Antheil. 

Born into a modest farming family, central to the artist’s work was a belief that art should be enjoyed by all, not just society’s privileged elite. For Léger, modern art was a means of elevating the quality of life for the working man. Seeing beauty in the everyday he created paintings depicting the world of labour including construction workers and people taking part in leisurely pursuits under radiant blue skies. Inspired by classical art and sculpture, he endowed his subjects with a sense of monumentality and dignity, as demonstrated in  

Image result

Léger 1948 49 Leisure (Homage to Jacques-Louis David), Musee Pompidou, Paris

Leisure - Homage to Louis David1948–9 and  




Fernand Léger
Study for 'The Constructors': The Team at Rest 
(Étude pour ‘Les Constructeurs’: L'Équipe au repos) 1950
Fernand Léger
Study for 'The Constructors': The Team at Rest
(Étude pour ‘Les Constructeurs’: L'Équipe au repos) 1950
Oil paint on canvas
1620 x 1295 mm
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh
Purchased 1984 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018. Photo: Antonia Reeve


Study for ‘The Constructors’: The Team at Rest 1950. 

Léger’s political beliefs also meant his work engaged with discourses of the day. Alongside architects including Le Corbusier, Léger created grandly-scaled photomurals that employed the same abstract and graphic style found in his painting. 

Fernand Léger (1881-1955) and Charlotte Perriand (1903-1999)

Fernand Léger (1881-1955) and Charlotte Perriand (1903-1999)
Essential Happiness, New Pleasures
Pavilion of Agriculture, Paris, International Exhibition
(Joies essentielles, plaisirs nouveaux.
Pavillon de l'Agriculture, Paris, Exposition Internationale) 1937– 2011
Acrylic paint, collage and print on paper on board
3500 x 9410 mm
Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid
Donated by Archives Charlotte Perriand-Pernette Perriand Barsac, Paris, 2012 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018. Photographic Archives Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia

Exhibited for the first time in the UK will be Essential Happiness, New Pleasures1937/2011 a work made in collaboration with architect and designer, Charlotte Perriand and a major highlight of the exhibition. This large-scale photomural first appeared at the International Exposition in Paris in 1937. In tandem with his socialist ideals against a backdrop of economic depression and the rise of totalitarianism in Europe, the mural promoted rural life, urging nations to work collectively to forge a better future for all. 

Fernand Léger: New Times, New Pleasures provides a comprehensive survey of the artist’s career, bringing together major loans from lenders including Centre Pompidou, Fondation Beyeler, and Moderna Museet in Stockholm. 

The exhibition is curated by Darren Pih, Exhibitions & Displays Curator and Laura Bruni, Assistant Curator, Tate Liverpool. It was initially developed by Lauren Barnes, formerly Assistant Curator, Tate Liverpool. 



High resolution press images can be downloaded fromtate.org.uk/press






trait
Fernand Léger
ABC, 1927
Fernand Léger
ABC, 1927
On paper
194 x 278 mm
Tate: Presented by Gustav and Elly Kahnweiler 1974, accessioned 1994

© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018
trait
Fernand LégerLeaves and Shell (Feuilles et coquillage) 1927
Fernand Léger
Leaves and Shell (Feuilles et coquillage) 1927
Oil paint on canvas
1295 x 972 mm
Tate: Purchased 1949

© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018
trait



trait
Fernand Léger
The Acrobat and his Partner, 1948
Fernand Léger
The Acrobat and his Partner (L'acrobate et sa partenaire) 1948
Oil paint on canvas
Support: 1302 x 1626 mm
Frame: 1402 x 1727 x 75 mm
Tate. Purchased 1980

© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018



trait
Fernand Léger
Two Women Holding Flowers, 1954
Fernand Léger
Two Women Holding Flowers (Deux femmes tenant des fleurs) 1954
Oil paint on canvas
972 x 1299 mm
Tate. Purchased 1959

© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018
trait
Fernand Léger
Young Girl Holding a Flower (Jeune fille tenant une fleur) 1954
Fernand Léger
Young Girl Holding a Flower (Jeune fille tenant une fleur) 1954
Oil paint on canvas
550 x 460 mm
The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018
© The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge



 

Mohamad Hafez Collateral Damage



Fairfield University - Walsh Gallery, Quick Center for the Arts
October 26 – December 15, 2018 

Born in Damascus, raised in Saudi Arabia, and educated in the Midwestern U.S., artist and architect Mohamad Hafez explores the impact of the political turmoil of the Middle East through hyper-realistic streetscapes crafted from found objects, paint, and scrap metal. Architectural in appearance yet politically charged in content, his miniaturized tableaus are alternately nostalgic, charming, and deeply painful.

Mohamad Hafez: Collateral Damage features a selection of work across multiple projects, including the site-specific installation

 

Sea Garbage.

Sea Garbage, as well as pieces from his Baggage series, in which the artist creates tableaus suggestive of the experience of refugees – many of whom are forced to flee their homes at short notice, or with only as much as they can carry – and places them inside vintage suitcases.

This exhibition also features selected works by two contemporary Syrian artists, photographer and digital artist Hala el-Abed and filmmaker Waref abu Quba, which explore themes of violence and loss centered around the Syrian refugee crisis.

Piece from Collateral Damage collection

Image: Mohamad Hafez, Hiraeth, 2017. Plaster, paint, rusted metal, found objects, rigid foam. 60 x 32 x 17 inches. © Mohamad Hafez.

Monday, November 12, 2018

Bouguereau & America

Milwaukee Art Museum 
February 15 through May 12, 2019

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art 
June 22 to September 22, 2019

San Diego Museum of Art,
 November 9, 2019, to March 15, 2020


William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825–1905) Admiration, 1897.  Oil on canvas, 58 × 78 in.  San Antonio Museum of Art, bequest of Mort D.  Goldberg,
William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825–1905) Admiration, 1897. Oil on canvas, 58 × 78 in. San Antonio Museum of Art, bequest of Mort D. Goldberg, (Photography by Roger Fry)
The work of French academic painter William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825–1905), who enjoyed remarkable popularity throughout America’s Gilded Age, is the focus of a new exhibition co-organized by the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Bouguereau & America is the first major exhibition of the artist’s work in nearly 30 years.



Image result

http://collection.mam.org/vmedia/tms768/r_l1888_5_001.jpg
William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825–1905) Homer and His Guide (Homère et son guide), 1874. Oil on canvas, 82 1/4 x 56 1/4 in. Milwaukee Art Museum, Layton Art Collection Inc., Gift of Frederick Layton Photographer credit: Larry Sanders

“Bouguereau is a defining figure in the history of French art, and an extraordinary painter whose masterful canvases evoke delight and wonder. In addition to that, however, Bouguereau’s work can teach us much more,” said Tanya Paul, Isabel and Alfred Bader Curator of European Art, Milwaukee Art Museum and co-curator of the exhibition. “The story of Bouguereau is the story of the way art rises and falls in popularity; the role dealers, collectors and patrons play in shaping art and taste; and, in many ways, the way art was collected as members of a new American merchant class tried to define themselves and their role in the world through culture.”

 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fb/William-Adolphe_Bouguereau_%281825-1905%29_-_Dawn_%281881%29.jpg
William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825–1905) Dawn (L'Aurore), 1881. Oil on canvas, 84 5/8 × 42 1/8 in. Collection of the Birmingham Museum of Art; Bequest of Nelle H. Stringfellow 

Opening February 15, 2019, at the Milwaukee Art Museum, Bouguereau & America will include more than 45 canvases by the French artist, whose renown peaked in America between the late 1860s and the early 1900s, and whose works form the backbone of many museum collections. Pulling together large-scale canvases from museums and private collections in the United States and Mexico, the exhibition presents not just the paintings, but also their provenance in order to examine their popularity and cultural relevance in America.

“Bouguereau delights and confounds us. It’s hard not to be seduced by his exquisite technique and the shameless beauty of his modest nymphs, woebegone children, and polished peasants,” said Stanton Thomas, former Curator of European and Decorative Arts, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, now Curator of Collections and Exhibitions, Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida, and co-curator of the exhibition. “But the question of meaning in these grand confections, which we are taught to expect from great art, often eludes us. This exhibition is a brilliant chance to revel in Bouguereau’s  paintings—which are very nearly tableaux-vivants—and to look a little more carefully at those luscious and perennially popular works.”

During the Gilded Age, owning a painting by Bouguereau was considered essential for any American who aspired to be a serious art collector. The artist’s grand representational canvases, with their self-conscious references to acknowledged masters like Raphael, brought a sense of sophistication to newly formed collections. Bouguereau & America takes a comprehensive and contemporary look at the artist’s reputation—once revered by Gilded Age collectors and later reviled by critics—and offers an opportunity to examine how society’s perspectives on art and subject matter can shift over time.

 “The elegance, technical perfection, and flawless surfaces of Bouguereau’s canvases have beguiled American collectors from the beginning,” said Emily Ballew Neff, Executive Director, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. “A milestone in the history of art collecting, this exhibition reveals why so many Gilded Age patrons keenly desired a Bouguereau for their art collections, and how so many of the artist’s enthusiastic patrons—and their Bouguereaus—were instrumental in the formation of art museums in the US.”

By reexamining Bouguereau’s collectors, the exhibition sheds light on how the history of collecting mirrors the religious beliefs, sexual mores and social problems of the period, as well as how the artist’s popularity influenced his subject matter.


Image result
A full-color exhibition catalogue will be published by Yale University Press with essays by the Bouguereau & America co-curators, as well as a group of distinguished scholars of the subject.

“With this exhibition, we are inviting visitors to look at these paintings not only as historically significant works but also as products of their time, allowing us to contemplate our values today,” said Marcelle Polednik, PhD, Donna and Donald Baumgartner Director, Milwaukee Art Museum. “By looking at Bouguereau and his role in the development of the American art collector, we are seeking to spark important conversations about the history and future of art and collecting.”
Bouguereau & America will be on view at the Milwaukee Art Museum from February 15 through May 12, 2019. The exhibition will then travel to the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art and be shown from June 22 to September 22, 2019. It will close at the San Diego Museum of Art, where it will be on view from November 9, 2019, to March 15, 2020.

This exhibition is co-organized by the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and Humanities.

Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today


National Portrait Gallery
November 2, 2018 - August 18, 2019
 
 
Drawing primarily from the National Portrait Gallery’s vast collection of self-portraits, this exhibition will explore how American artists have chosen to portray themselves since the beginning of the last century. As people are confronted each day with “selfies” via social media and as they continue to examine the fluidity of contemporary identity, this is an opportune time to reassess the significance of self-portraiture in relation to the country’s history and culture. The exhibition will feature more than 75 works by artists such as Josef Albers, Patricia Cronin, Imogen Cunningham, Elaine de Kooning, Edward Hopper, Joan Jonas, Jacob Lawrence, Alice Neel, Louise Nevelson, Diego Rivera, Lucas Samaras, Fritz Scholder, Roger Shimomura, Shahzia Sikander and Martin Wong. “Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today” is curated by Brandon Brame Fortune, chief curator, National Portrait Gallery. This exhibition concludes the Portrait Gallery’s 50th anniversary celebrations, and an expanded, illustrated companion book will be published in spring 2019.

Bare chested man with his wife in a bathing suit



Self-Portrait with Rita / Thomas Hart Benton (15 Apr 1889 - 9 Jan 1975) / c. 1924 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Mooney

Older woman seated in a chair, nude

  • Alice Neel Self-Portrait / Alice Neel (28 Jan 1900 - 13 Oct 1984) / 1980 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • Woman with short hair resting her chin on her hand
    Berenice Abbott Self-Portrait / Berenice Abbott (17 Jul 1898 - 9 Dec 1991) / c. 1932 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • Drawing of an empty bathrobe
    Bathrobe / Jim Dine (born 16 Jun 1935) / 1964 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; the Ruth Bowman and Harry Kahn Twentieth Century American Self-Portrait Collection Conserved with funds from the Smithsonian Women's Committee
  • Quilt depicting scenes from the artists life
    Faith Ringgold Self-Portrait / Faith Ringgold (born 8 Oct 1930) / 1998 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • abstract portrait of a man with his cat
    Self Portrait with Grey Cat, 2003 / Fritz Scholder (6 Oct 1937 - 10 Feb 2005) / 2003 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • Sculpture of two women reclining together
    Memorial To A Marriage / Patricia Cronin (born 1963) / modeled 2002, cast 2013 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Chuck Close
 


  • Older woman seated in a chair, nude
    Alice Neel Self-Portrait / Alice Neel (28 Jan 1900 - 13 Oct 1984) / 1980 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • Woman with short hair resting her chin on her hand
    Berenice Abbott Self-Portrait / Berenice Abbott (17 Jul 1898 - 9 Dec 1991) / c. 1932 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • Drawing of an empty bathrobe
    Bathrobe / Jim Dine (born 16 Jun 1935) / 1964 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; the Ruth Bowman and Harry Kahn Twentieth Century American Self-Portrait Collection Conserved with funds from the Smithsonian Women's Committee
  • Quilt depicting scenes from the artists life
    Faith Ringgold Self-Portrait / Faith Ringgold (born 8 Oct 1930) / 1998 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • abstract portrait of a man with his cat
    Self Portrait with Grey Cat, 2003 / Fritz Scholder (6 Oct 1937 - 10 Feb 2005) / 2003 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • Sculpture of two women reclining together
    Memorial To A Marriage / Patricia Cronin (born 1963) / modeled 2002, cast 2013 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Chuck Close
  • Six brightly colored panels of the same mans portrait
    Aliens Sans Frontières / Enrique Chagoya / 2016 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • Who's Sorry Now / Molly Soda (born 28 Jan 1989) / 2017 / 315 Gallery, Brooklyn, NY