Saturday, July 14, 2018

Leonardo: Discoveries from Verrocchio’s Studio



Yale University Art Gallery 



June 29–October 7, 2018
A landmark exhibition investigating Leonardo da Vinci’s early years as an artist, featuring paintings newly attributed to the Renaissance master

On view at the from June 29 through October 7, Leonardo: Discoveries from Verrocchio’s Studio investigates a virtually unknown period in the career of perhaps the most famous artist of the Italian Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519).



Leonardo da Vinci and Lorenzo di Credi, A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo (detail), ca. 1475–85. Oil on panel. Worcester Art Museum, Mass., Theodore T. and Mary G. Ellis Collection, inv. no. 1940.29. Photo: Image courtesy the Worcester Art Museum






Leonardo da Vinci and Lorenzo di Credi, A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo (detail), ca. 1475–85. Oil on panel. Worcester Art Museum, Mass., Theodore T. and Mary G. Ellis Collection, inv. no. 1940.29. Photo: Image courtesy the Worcester Art Museum.

The exhibition focuses on the claim of Leonardo’s first biographers that as a boy he was apprenticed to the sculptor, painter, and goldsmith Andrea del Verrocchio (ca. 1435–1488). Verrocchio is a mysterious personality. While many of his sculptures in bronze and marble are today admired as iconic masterpieces of 15th-century Florentine art, scholars have never agreed on a list of surviving paintings that might be by him, or even whether any of them are by one artist alone. Consequently, previous attempts to determine what Leonardo might have learned from Verrocchio have rarely led to serious proposals to identify the earliest works of that revolutionary genius.

Only one fully documented altarpiece commissioned from Andrea del Verrocchio is known. Installed in the cathedral of Pistoia, near Florence, it was described in the 16th century as the work of Leonardo’s fellow pupil in Verrocchio’s shop, Lorenzo di Credi, an attribution accepted without question by most scholars. Two small paintings once part of this altarpiece—an Annunciation and a scene depicting a miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo—are now in the collections of the Musée du Louvre, Paris, and the Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts, respectively. These, too, have conventionally been attributed to Lorenzo di Credi, an artist of relatively modest talents.

In March of this year, a small exhibition in Worcester united the Louvre and Worcester paintings for the first time since they were separated, probably in the early 19th century. The Gallery’s exhibition follows that display with 11 additional paintings and sculptures, exploring the wider context of Verrocchio and his studio of artist-helpers. Among these studio assistants, the most remarkable by far was Leonardo da Vinci, and the exhibition at Yale argues that it was Leonardo, not his younger “classmate” Lorenzo, who should be recognized as the author of the Louvre painting as well as large parts of the Worcester panel.

Another painting being shown at the Gallery may also have been conceived as a Verrocchio commission, but like the Louvre and Worcester panels, it was largely executed by Leonardo. The little-known Triumph of Aemilius Paulus from the Musée Jacquemart-André in Paris has only twice before been exhibited publicly. It is one of a pair of panels that functioned as fronts of cassoni: painted furniture chests commissioned for patrician weddings in Florence, this one involving the Mannelli family in or around 1473.

 File:Andrea del Verrocchio - The Battle of Pydna - WGA24993.jpg

Its companion, the Battle of Pydna—which is also preserved at the Musée Jacquemart-André and was also painted in large part by Leonardo—could not travel to New Haven but is fully discussed in the related publication Leonardo: Discoveries from Verrocchio’s Studio, Early Paintings and New Attributions, being released by the Yale University Art Gallery concurrent with the exhibition.

Two other major paintings that could not travel are also identified as collaborations between Leonardo and another artist, in this case probably his teacher, Verrocchio, and are discussed at length in the book:

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the Virgin and Child with Two Angels in the National Gallery, London,

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and the Virgin with the Seated Child in the Gemäldegalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.

While it springs from a renewed focus on Verrocchio as a painter and the influence he exerted on the young Leonardo, the Gallery’s exhibition also investigates the collaborative nature of sculptures produced in what must have been a large and industrious workshop. It includes three rarely studied sculptures in marble, terracotta, and stucco, each with a reasonable claim to having been made by Verrocchio and illustrating different aspects of his reliance on pupils and assistants.

Comparative works by Lorenzo di Credi, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Francesco di Simone Ferrucci, Biagio d’Antonio, and Jacopo del Sellaio attest to the spread of Verrocchio’s influence throughout Florentine artistic circles at the end of the 15th century. Finally, two paintings—one of which, in a private collection, has never before been exhibited publicly—are proposed as possible early works by Verrocchio, completing the hypothetical picture of the early careers of both the master and his illustrious pupil.

 “The seeds of this exhibition were sown over 20 years ago when Laurence Kanter, now Chief Curator and the Lionel Goldfrank III Curator of European Art at the Gallery, then Curator-in-Charge of the Robert Lehman Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, noticed that a small painting, A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo in the Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts, modestly attributed there to Leonardo’s friend, fellow student, and imitator Lorenzo di Credi, must have been painted as a collaborative effort with Leonardo himself,” explains Jock Reynolds, the Henry J. Heinz II Director at the Gallery. “The painting then became an object of close study and analysis by our good colleagues at Worcester and by their counterparts at the Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France and the Musée du Louvre, Paris, where a companion panel, the Annunciation, has long been a bone of contention among Leonardo scholars. Their work, combined with Kanter’s further research into comparable objects and historical context, blossomed in unforeseen directions, resulting in this controversial and compelling exhibition and publication.”

Kanter’s attributions rest on three main premises: that Lorenzo di Credi not only was a painter of inferior talent and intellect to his friend Leonardo but also had a distinctively recognizable style of his own; that paintings and sculptures produced in Verrocchio’s studio, as in so many Renaissance workshops, more frequently merit multiple attributions than is commonly supposed; and that Leonardo must have learned to paint in tempera before mastering his characteristic oil technique, as tempera was the medium employed by his mentor, Verrocchio. Few art historians have attempted to ascribe early works in tempera to the Renaissance polymath.

“While attributing new paintings to Leonardo may be seen as an act of hubris,” states Kanter, “simply recognizing the logic behind these three premises indicates how repetitive, and at the same time uncertain, scholarship can be, even about the works of this artistic giant. Perhaps misled by unquestioned ‘truths’ or reverence for the canon, we lose sight of the fact that Leonardo, like young people of every generation, began as a student. Even genius needs to start somewhere. With patience and close looking, it is usually possible to trace the path of those first steps.” Leonardo: Discoveries from Verrocchio’s Studio invites all—scholars, art lovers, and those who are simply curious— to look closely, consider the evidence, and come to their own conclusions.


1] Leonardo da Vinci,
The Annunciation,ca. 1475–79. Oil on panel. Musée du Louvre, Paris,
Photo: Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France,
Jean-Louis Bellec


2] Leonardo da Vinci,The Annunciation(detail), ca. 1475–79. Oil on panel. Musée du Louvre, Paris, Photo: Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France
Jean-Louis Bellec


3] Leonardo da Vinci and Lorenzo di Credi,
A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo,ca. 1475–85. Oil on
panel. Worcester Art Museum, Mass., Theodore T. and Mary G. Ellis Collection, .
Photo: Image courtesy the Worcester Art Museum


4] Leonardo da Vinci and Lorenzo di Credi,
A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo (detail), ca. 1475–85.
Oil on panel. Worcester Art Museum, Mass., Theodore T. and Mary G. Ellis Collection, inv. no. 1940.29.
Photo: Image courtesy the Worcester Art Museum


5] Leonardo da Vinci and collaborator,
The Triumph of Aemilius Paulus,ca. 1472–73. Tempera on panel.
Musée Jacquemart-André, Institut de France, Paris,Photo:
©
 Studio Sébert
Photographes


6] Leonardo da Vinci and collaborator,
The Triumph of Aemilius Paulus
 (detail), ca. 1472–73. Tempera
on panel. Musée Jacquemart-André, Institut de France, Paris, inv. no.
mjap-p
 1822.2. Photo:
©
 Studio
Sébert Photographes


7] Lorenzo di Credi,
The Annunciation,ca. 1500. Oil on panel. Alana Collection, Newark, Del.
Photo: Christopher Gardner


8] Andrea del Verrocchio,
 Virgin and Child,ca. 1465. Tempera on panel. Alana Collection, Newark, Del.
Photo: © Foto Giusti Claudio


9] Andrea del Verrocchio and workshop(?),
Virgin and Child with an Angel,ca. 1475–85. Marble.
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Gift of Quincy Adams Shaw through Quincy Adams Shaw, Jr., and Mrs. Marian Shaw Haughton, Photo: © 2018 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Andrea del Verrocchio,
Virgin and Child,ca. 1470–75. Stucco. Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin
College, Ohio, R. T. Miller, Jr., Fund, inv. no. 1944.167. Photo: Image courtesy Allen Memorial Art
Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio

Related Publication

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Leonardo: Discoveries from Verrocchio’s Studio, Early Paintings and New Attributions
Laurence Kanter
With contributions by Bruno Mottin and Rita Piccione Albertson

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This groundbreaking reexamination of the beginnings of Leonardo da Vinci’s life as an artist sug- gests new candidates for his earliest surviving work and revises our understanding of his role in the studio of his teacher, Andrea del Verrocchio. Anchoring this analysis are important yet often overlooked considerations about Verrocchio’s studio—specifically, the collaborative nature of most works that emerged from it and the probability that Leonardo must initially have learned to paint in tempera, as his teacher did.

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The book searches for the young artist’s hand among the tempera works from Verrocchio’s studio and proposes new criteria for judging Verrocchio’s own painting style. Several paintings are identified here as likely the work of Leonardo, and others long consid- ered works by Verrocchio or his assistant Lorenzo di Credi may now be seen as collaborations with Leonardo sometime before his departure from Florence in 1482/83.

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In addition to Laurence Kanter’s detailed arguments, the book features three essays presenting recent scientific analysis and imaging that support the new attributions of paintings, or parts of paintings, to Leonardo.

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146 pages / 8 × 111/4 inches / 102 color and 17 black-and-white illustrations / Distributed by Yale University Press / 2018 / Hardcover / ISBN 978-0-300-23301-8 / Price $35; Members $28

Exhibition Credits

Exhibition organized by Laurence Kanter, Chief Curator and the Lionel Goldfrank III Curator of European 

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Celebrating Tintoretto: Portrait Paintings and Studio Drawings

Exhibition Dates:October 16, 2018–October 1, 2020
Exhibition Location:
The Met Fifth Avenue
Celebrating Tintoretto: Portrait Paintings and Studio Drawings will focus on the small-scale, informal portraiture of Venetian painter Jacopo Tintoretto in celebration of the 500th anniversary of his birth.
Jacopo Tintoretto was one of the preeminent Venetian painters of the sixteenth century, renowned for his monumental narrative scenes and his insightful portraits of patricians and citizens. In celebration of the five hundredth anniversary of the artist's birth, this exhibition explores an innovative and little-studied aspect of Tintoretto's portraiture: small-scale, informal portrait heads characterized by immediacy, intense observation, and startling modernity. These works capture both the appearance and the spirit of the sitter, and are painted with the artist's famous prestezza, or quickness.

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The exhibition brings together for the first time approximately ten portrait studies from European and American museums and private collections, drawing them into a larger discussion of the artist's portraiture and approach to painting. The exhibition also highlights significant facets of artistic practice in the Tintoretto workshop, in particular the dynamic relationship between Jacopo and his son Domenico, through a series of figural drawings

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and a painting in The Met collection, The Finding of Moses.


Celebrating Tintoretto: Portrait Paintings and Studio Drawings is organized by Andrea Bayer, The Met's interim Deputy Director for Collections and Administration and Jayne Wrightsman Curator in the Department of European Paintings, and Alison Manges Nogueira, Associate Curator in The Robert Lehman Collection.

Monday, July 9, 2018

John Singer Sargent and Chicago's Gilded Age


From July 1 through September 30, 2018, the Art Institute of Chicago will present an exhibition of American portraitist John Singer Sargent with a focus on his numerous Chicago connections. Featuring nearly 100 objects from the Art Institute’s collection, private collections, and public institutions, John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age examines Sargent’s impressive breadth of artistic practice and the network of associations among the artist, his patrons, his creative circle, and the city. 

Through the lens of Sargent’s work, this exhibition explores the cultural ambitions of Chicagoans to shape the city into a center of art, the development of an international profile for American artists, and the interplay of traditionalism and modernism at the turn of the 20th century. 
John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) was the most sought-after portraitist of his generation, creating powerful, striking likenesses of his sitters. 

Although he is best known for his portraits, Sargent excelled in a variety of genres and media, including landscapes, watercolors, and murals. 

This exhibition presents the full range of Sargent’s talents, surveying his touchpoints to Chicago while also illuminating the city’s vibrant art scene. Sargent first showed at the Art Institute—at the time located at Michigan Avenue and Van Buren Street—in 1890, the year Chicago officially became the nation’s “second city” in terms of population. 

 
John Singer Sargent. La Carmencita, 1890. Musee d'Orsay, Paris. © RMN (Musée d’Orsay) / Gérard Blot.

Among his paintings on view was La Carmencita, a commanding portrait of a Spanish dancer that is at once old and new—a tribute to Old Master painting that is also an Impressionist exploration of color and brushwork. The composition drew crowds of visitors to the museum, helping to put Chicago on the map as a recognized center for contemporary art and culture. After rebuilding from the Great Fire of 1871, the city was an amalgam of new and old itself–attuned to innovation and change while also recognizing the value of traditions.
In the late 19th century, Chicago leaders endeavored to advance the city’s cultural profile to match its already prominent reputation as a center of industry and transportation. 



Exhibition curator Annelise K. Madsen, Gilda and Henry Buchbinder Assistant Curator of American Art, describes this study of Chicago through the lens of Sargent: 

“The Midwest is perhaps an unexpected point of departure for an examination of this thoroughly cosmopolitan painter, who made his career in Europe, attracted a transatlantic set of patrons, and cultivated professional ties primarily on the East Coast. Yet Sargent was indeed a fascinating player in the cultural history of Chicago at the turn of the 20th century. This exhibition presents the scope of Sargent’s talents while also recounting the integral narratives of local collectors, exhibitions, and institutions that are part of the artworks’ own histories.”
Between 1888 and 1925, Sargent’s paintings were included in more than 20 public displays in the city, among them the Inter-State Industrial Exposition, the World’s Columbian Exposition, exhibitions at the Arts Club of Chicago, and the Art Institute’s American Annuals. 


John Singer Sargent. Portrait of Charles Deering, 1917. The Art Institute of Chicago, anonymous loan.

The artist’s Chicago story owes much to local businessman Charles Deering, who built an important collection of his works over a lifetime of friendship. Other area patrons and Art Institute supporters, including Martin A. Ryerson, Annie Swan Coburn, Robert Allerton, and the Friends of American Art, attest to the city’s enthusiasm for the artist and made possible the museum’s early acquisitions of his work.

Catalogue:



John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age

Annelise K. Madsen; With contributions by Richard Ormond and Mary Broadway

This groundbreaking study focuses on John Singer Sargent’s sustained, yet largely overlooked, involvement with Chicago’s vibrant Gilded Age culture. Documenting the artist’s personal connections to the city and the prominence of his work in Chicago collections, Annelise K. Madsen explores Sargent’s various contributions to Chicago’s artistic life, including his long-standing participation in local exhibitions. With scholarly rigor, this volume also delves into the taste and scope of midwestern patronage at the turn of the century, offering valuable insights into Chicago’s civic and cultural ambitions. 
 
Richly illustrated, John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age is an original and engaging examination of the complex relationship between one of the most cosmopolitan artists of his generation and the city of Chicago.
 
Annelise K. Madsen is the Gilda and Henry Buchbinder Assistant Curator of American Art and Mary Broadway is associate conservator of prints and drawings, both at the Art Institute of Chicago. Richard Ormond is John Singer Sargent’s grandnephew and a leading scholar of the artist’s work. 




John Singer Sargent. The Fountain, Villa Torlonia, Frascati, Italy, 1907. The Art Institute of Chicago, Friends of American Art Collection. 



John Singer Sargent. Harriett Pullman Carolan, 1911. Private collection.

 
 


John Singer Sargent. Lake O'Hara, 1916. Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Louise E. Bettens Fund.



John Singer Sargent. Portrait of Mrs. Edward L. Davis and Her Son, Livingston Davis, 1890. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Frances and Armand Hammer Purchase Fund. Photo © Museum Associates/ L



John Singer Sargent. Street in Venice, 1882. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Avalon Foundation.

Friday, July 6, 2018

Gustav Klimt. Artist of the Century - Leopold Museum



Comprehensive exhibition divided into eight thematic emphases highlights periods in the artist’s oeuvre

Marking the transition from historicism to Jugendstil, Gustav Klimt’s oeuvre shaped the beginning of modern art in Vienna. 100 years after his death, the Leopold Museum pays tribute to the leading figure in Vienna around 1900 with a comprehensive exhibition divided into eight thematic emphases and illustrating all the periods of the artist’s oeuvre by means of some 35 paintings, 90 drawings, 30 photographs and approx. 150 archival documents.

Along with exhibits from the Leopold Museum and the Leopold Private Collection, the exhibition also features numerous works given to the museum by a Klimt descendant as a new permanent loan, as well as four paintings and six drawings from a private collection, which were also entrusted to the museum as permanent loans. The presentation further includes select loans from Austrian and international collections, and for the first time provides comprehensive insights into the collection of the Klimt Foundation, which acts as scientific research and cooperation partner to this exhibition.

The presentation Gustav Klimt. Artist of the Century traces an arc from Klimt’s beginnings at the height of the Gründerzeit era dominated by historicism, via his artistic paradigm shift and the evolution of his own, individual style from the mid-1890s, when he created his first drafts for the Faculty Paintings for the ceremonial hall of Vienna University, which would cause a scandal. The overview continues with Gustav Klimt as a leading figure of the Vienna Secession, whose members broke with esthetical conventions and paved the way for Jugendstil, and goes on to shine the spotlight on his activities as a sought-after portraitist of the wealthy Viennese bourgeoisie as well as on his highly erotic, symbolistically charged female depictions.

Sommer sojourns in the Salzkammergut region – Klimt’s landscapes

Gustav Klimt’s regular summer sojourns on the Attersee with Emilie Flöge and her family set in around the turn of the century. Klimt’s need for privacy and distance was especially great after the controversy caused by his Faculty Paintings. Far from the city and surrounded by intimate friends, Klimt found both relaxation and inspiration. A selection of his works created during these stays in the Salzkammergut region can be seen in the exhibition.

“Along with exceptional works from international collections and from the museum’s own holdings, a new permanent loan is now on display at the Leopold Museum – Klimt’s only Viennese landscape, the work Schönbrunn Landscape (1916). Klimt’s landscapes make up around one quarter of his painterly oeuvre. They were predominantly created in nature, or at times from photographs and picture postcards in his Vienna studio. The artist wanted to depict a natural environment independent of man that reflects a tranquil atmosphere – his interest in a symbolic expression and in aspects of timelessness and transience were central to these works,” explains Hans-Peter Wipplinger, the curator of the exhibition.

Death and Life and The Bride enter into a dialogue for the first time

The exhibition sees two monumental allegorical works by Klimt enter into a dialogue for the first time: Death and Life (1910/11, reworked in 1915/16) has been part of the Leopold Museum’s collection compiled by Rudolf Leopold for 40 years, while The Bride(1917/18) was brought into the collection of the Klimt Foundation in 2013. Since the Faculty Paintings, Gustav Klimt had addressed the cycle of life and its individual phases.

During the last years of his oeuvre, and shaped by personal experiences, Klimt started to rework the first version of Death and Life in 1915 and transferred depictions of individual stages of life as solitary figures to his work The Bride. The paintings, which are both shown in the exhibition, were prepared by Klimt with numerous drawings. The sketchbook for his last allegory has survived, and affords valuable insights into the process of the work’s composition and creation.

“The first presentation of drawings along with the extant sketchbook and the painting The Bride from the collection of the Klimt Foundation allows visitors to delve directly into the fantasies and visions of this exceptional artist. The painting further affords scope for new interpretations and, through its Expressionist accents, links Gustav Klimt as a pioneer of modernism in Austria with his successors Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele,” according to the exhibition’s curator Sandra Tretter.




GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
FRAUENBILDNIS, UM 1893
PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN, C. 1893
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
155 × 75 cm
Belvedere, Wien, 2013, Dauerleihgabe aus Privatbesitz
Belvedere, Vienna, 2013, Permanent loan from private collection
Foto
| Photo:
Belvedere, Wien
| Vienna/
Johannes Stoll

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
KLARA KLIMT, UM 1880
KLARA KLIMT, C. 1880
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
30,3 × 21,3 cm
ARGE Sammlung Gustav Klimt/Dauerleihgabe im Leopold Museum, Wien
ARGE Collection Gustav Klimt/Permanent loan, Leopold Museum, Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
SITZENDES JUNGES MÄDCHEN, UM 1894
SEATED YOUNG GIRL, C. 1894
Öl auf Holz
| Oil on wood
14,1 × 9,6 cm
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

Studie für 'Schubert am Klavier' 1898

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
SCHUBERT AM KLAVIER (ENTWURF), 1896
SCHUBERT AT THE PIANO (STUDY)
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
30 × 39 cm
Privatsammlung/Dauerleihgabe im Leopold Museum, Wien
Private collection/Permanent loan, Leopold Museum, Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
MÄDCHEN IM GRÜNEN, 1896–1899
GIRL IN THE FOLIAGE
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
32,4 × 24 cm
Klimt-Foundation, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Klimt-Foundation, Wien
| Vienna





GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
AM ATTERSEE, 1900
ON LAKE ATTERSEE
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
80,2 × 80,2 cm
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
DIE GROSSE PAPPEL II (AUFSTEIGENDES GEWITTER), 1902/03
THE LARGE POPLAR II (GATHERING STORM)
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
100,8 × 100,8 cm
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
OBSTGARTEN AM ABEND, 1898
ORCHARD IN THE EVENING
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
69 × 55,6 cm
Privatsammlung/Dauerleihgabe im Leopold Museum, Wien
Private collection/Permanent loan, Leopold Museum, Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
TANNENWALD I, 1901
PINE FOREST I
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
90,5 × 90 cm
Kunsthaus Zug, Stiftung Sammlung Kamm
Foto
| Photo:
Kunsthaus Zug, Stiftung Sammlung Kamm/Alfred Frommenwiler




GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
FREUNDINNEN I (DIE SCHWESTERN), 1907
FRIENDS I (SISTERS)
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
125 × 42 cm
Klimt-Foundation, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Klimt-Foundation, Wien
| Vienna

 


GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
SCHÖNBRUNNER LANDSCHAFT, 1916
SCHÖNBRUNN LANDSCAPE
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
110 × 110 cm
Privatbesitz
| Private collection
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
TOD UND LEBEN, 1910/11, UMGEARBEITET 1915/16
DEATH AND LIFE, REWORKED IN 1915/16
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
180,8 × 200,6 cm
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
DIE BRAUT, 1917/18 (UNVOLLENDET)
THE BRIDE, 1917/18 (UNFINISHED)
Öl, schwarze Kreide auf Leinwand
| Oil, black chalk on canvas
165 × 191 cm
Klimt-Foundation, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Klimt-Foundation, Wien
| Vienna

 

GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
LITZLBERGKELLER, 1915/16
Öl auf Leinwand
| Oil on canvas
110 × 110 cm
Privatsammlung
| Private collection
Foto
| Photo:
Bildarchiv
| picture archives
Manfred Thumberger

 



GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
BRUSTBILD EINER JUNGEN DAME MIT HUT UND CAPE IM PROFIL NACH LINKS, 1897/98
BUST PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG LADY WITH HAT AND CAPE IN PROFILE FROM THE LEFT
Kohle, schwarze Kreide auf Packpapier
| Charcoal, black chalk on brown paper
42,3 × 22,6 cm
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger

 
 
GUSTAV KLIMT
1862–1918
TÄNZERIN IM FLAMENCO-KOSTÜM,
STUDIE ZU „JUDITH II (SALOME)“, UM 1908
DANCER IN A FLAMENCO COSTUME,
STUDY FOR
JUDITH II (SALOME), C. 1908
Bleistift, roter Farbstift, schwarze Kreide, Gouache, Deckweiß auf Japanpapier
Pencil, red crayon, black chalk, gouache, opaque white on Japanese paper
55 × 34,9 cm
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna
Foto
| Photo:
Leopold Museum, Wien
| Vienna/
Manfred Thumberger